Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC:

President Bobby 1 week 2 days ago #394973

  • SLYFOXX1968
  • SLYFOXX1968's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Posts: 950
  • Thank you received: 550
My Children are well into their careers and it’s my Grandchildren who are in the College mix . 1 Graddaughter just graduated from Binghamton . Studying to apply to Med School . 1 Grandson will graduate from Manhattan College next Spring . Another Granddaughter is a Jr at Notre Dame . Another Grandson a sophomore at Purdue . Grandson will be frosh at Penn State and another Granddaughter will be a freshMan at Univ of Virginia . None had St John’s on their list . None of them are Business or Pharmacy Students so , St John’s wasn’t really in the Mix of their interest . The reality is that the Schools they do go to are State Schools , except the ones who go to ND and Manhattan . The Grandson who is a Senior at Manhattan , thought he wanted to be a Engineering Major until he took his first Course of Engineering 101. He switched to Liberal Arts . And , ND is , well, ND .
The following user(s) said Thank You: panther2

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

President Bobby 1 week 2 days ago #394976

  • L J S A
  • L J S A's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Posts: 6715
  • Thank you received: 3136

Mike Zaun wrote: I used to make fun of people moving to the South since I really do love NY and we've been here since my ancestors came over in 1913 to Ellis Island. But being an adult now I understand. 14k taxes vs. 2k. Housing is $200k for a big beautiful house and tons of land vs. $800k for the same here. Being a young adult this day in age is kinda crazy.


A bunch of people I grew up with in Elmont moved south in the '90s, and most came back because they couldn't find real work, it was boring, etc. You'd really need to carefully consider all your interests and consider how likely it would be to satisfy them moving somewhere outside New York.

I read an article just last night that now might be the time to make the move, though: People who realized they could WFH full time -- and finally forced their employers to realize it too -- will be moving outside cities to get more bang for their buck, which will also force an amenities boom around them. The key is to get in early before the city folk drive up the prices too much.

A small or midsize city with cheap suburbs is probably a good bet if you wanted to move and were patient enough to wait for the boom.
The following user(s) said Thank You: panther2

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

President Bobby 1 week 1 day ago #395081

  • Beast of the East
  • Beast of the East's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Posts: 11832
  • Thank you received: 3781

L J S A wrote:

Mike Zaun wrote: I used to make fun of people moving to the South since I really do love NY and we've been here since my ancestors came over in 1913 to Ellis Island. But being an adult now I understand. 14k taxes vs. 2k. Housing is $200k for a big beautiful house and tons of land vs. $800k for the same here. Being a young adult this day in age is kinda crazy.


A bunch of people I grew up with in Elmont moved south in the '90s, and most came back because they couldn't find real work, it was boring, etc. You'd really need to carefully consider all your interests and consider how likely it would be to satisfy them moving somewhere outside New York.

I read an article just last night that now might be the time to make the move, though: People who realized they could WFH full time -- and finally forced their employers to realize it too -- will be moving outside cities to get more bang for their buck, which will also force an amenities boom around them. The key is to get in early before the city folk drive up the prices too much.

A small or midsize city with cheap suburbs is probably a good bet if you wanted to move and were patient enough to wait for the boom.


Here's what NYC area workers, and Americans at large have to worry about in terms of WFH.

Once employers get comfortable with a WFH work force, as many already have been, you can basically hire from anywhere to reduce labor costs. You can find talented people outside of NY and hire at much lower salaries, because cost of living is much lower and job opportunities are less abundant. Additionally when you consider that a lot of work can be done from anywhere outside of the US, you can maintain a smaller US based workforce and have non-client facing work done elsewhere.

English has now become the universal language, and just about everywhere grade school children learn English from a very early age. In some places, kids grow up speaking only lightly accented English, are well educated, and can easily replace WFH US workers with little to no degradation and at much lower cost.
The following user(s) said Thank You: IDRAFT

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

President Bobby 1 week 1 day ago #395082

  • redmanwest
  • redmanwest's Avatar
  • Away
  • Posts: 933
  • Thank you received: 535
NM

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by redmanwest.

President Bobby 1 week 1 day ago #395097

  • fuchsia
  • fuchsia's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Posts: 1757
  • Thank you received: 520

Beast of the East wrote:

L J S A wrote:

Mike Zaun wrote: I used to make fun of people moving to the South since I really do love NY and we've been here since my ancestors came over in 1913 to Ellis Island. But being an adult now I understand. 14k taxes vs. 2k. Housing is $200k for a big beautiful house and tons of land vs. $800k for the same here. Being a young adult this day in age is kinda crazy.


A bunch of people I grew up with in Elmont moved south in the '90s, and most came back because they couldn't find real work, it was boring, etc. You'd really need to carefully consider all your interests and consider how likely it would be to satisfy them moving somewhere outside New York.

I read an article just last night that now might be the time to make the move, though: People who realized they could WFH full time -- and finally forced their employers to realize it too -- will be moving outside cities to get more bang for their buck, which will also force an amenities boom around them. The key is to get in early before the city folk drive up the prices too much.

A small or midsize city with cheap suburbs is probably a good bet if you wanted to move and were patient enough to wait for the boom.


Here's what NYC area workers, and Americans at large have to worry about in terms of WFH.

Once employers get comfortable with a WFH work force, as many already have been, you can basically hire from anywhere to reduce labor costs. You can find talented people outside of NY and hire at much lower salaries, because cost of living is much lower and job opportunities are less abundant. Additionally when you consider that a lot of work can be done from anywhere outside of the US, you can maintain a smaller US based workforce and have non-client facing work done elsewhere.

English has now become the universal language, and just about everywhere grade school children learn English from a very early age. In some places, kids grow up speaking only lightly accented English, are well educated, and can easily replace WFH US workers with little to no degradation and at much lower cost.


Beast, the hidden element here for me is culture. Having survived endless calls with off shore phone bank staffers, I routinely ask to speak with a US based supervisor the moment I am informed that a discretionary decision is required... because workers in recently post-colonial settings are adhering to the value of pleasing the boss by the precision of their rule compliance, while Americans know that within reason, customer accommodation yields customer satisfaction and customer loyalty.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Beast of the East, panther2

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

President Bobby 1 week 21 hours ago #395139

  • Adam
  • Adam's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Posts: 2360
  • Thank you received: 1238
I grew up in the south (see my avatar) and went to SJU for grad school because they offered me a GA position. I currently live in Astoria. I've lived in most of the best cities in the south, including Atlanta, Raleigh and Charlotte (suburbs for all 3). Also went to college in NC.

New York has some advantages while the south has some too. The big cities in the south are a LOT newer/more modern and far less expensive. Unless you're a millionaire, your house/apartment is guaranteed to be significantly better in the south. You also don't see a bunch of run down areas and the electricity polls are underground. It was a shock to me going from the south to anywhere in NYC outside of Manhattan. Things like a loud heater, noisy floorboards and AC units aren't things down there. St. John's campus is also incredibly mediocre. D'Angelo Center is the only area remotely similar to what you'd find on major southern campuses. Everything else looks pulled from a 50's high school.

That said, the BIG attractions in New York and the stadiums (MSG, Citi, etc) are far better than the southern equivalents (if they even exist). Raleigh/Charlotte are great for college basketball obviously, but there isn't an MLB stadium within 5 hours. Broadway, attractions and all that are also completely different. You can basically see the major attractions of Atlanta/Raleigh/Charlotte in a weekend. The downtown of Raleigh/Charlotte takes just a couple minutes to drive through and there's nothing there.

This is the main reason I'm such a big supporter of having more MSG games. Cragg I'm sure knows this. Being out on the border of Long Island we can't compete with the college town campuses of the south, so we need to have a strong MSG presence.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Room112, jackfro

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Adam.
Moderators: mkras99SJUFAN2espkengmanlawmanfankranmarsOhioFanotisredmannorthKnight